Choose the Proper Elements of Style for Your Presentations

The first presentation by me I’ll always remember. You would never use the passive tense to say, “I’ll always remember my first presentation.” Would you?

Yet speakers too often use passive tenses in their presentationsUse proper grammar in your presentations As Strunk and White state in their classic The Elements of Style: “Avoid tame, colorless, hesitating, noncommittal language.”

This gem of a book has guided writers for more than 50 years. In 2011, Time Magazine listed it among The Best 100 Non-Fiction Books ever written. We urge everyone who values simple writing to read it. …Read more…

Do Your Eyeglasses Detract From Your Presentations and TV Interviews?

In the past, people used the pejorative four eyes for people who wore glasses. Name-calling is never appropriate, especially when someone has poor vision or a serious disability.

Elton John

Today eyeglasses have become a popular fashion statement. Glasses are an accessory to your wardrobe that can enhance – or detract — from your overall appearance especially when you’re making a presentation or being interviewed on TV.

Celebrities like Johnny Depp, Tina Fey and, most famously, Elton John and Sarah Palin are known for the distinctive eyeglasses they wear in public appearances – so why not you? …Read more…

Use “Power Words” in Presentations and Media Interviews

When speakers at a conference and commentators on television begin a sentence with “I think” or “I hope,” it detracts from their expertise. Those are not power words.Power Words

Even well-known experts often start a sentence with tentative phrases. You aren’t invited to speak at a conference or appear on national television for what you think. You’re invited for what you know. You’re the expert. …Read more…

Are You Sabotaging Your Presentations With an Out-of-Date Image?

If your business presentations are falling flat, then you may be ready for an image update. The term “business casual” has taken on new meaning. Originally, this term was defined as a sports jacket and pants with an open-neck shirt for men. For women, it was a crisp, professional looking blouse with pants or a skirt, topped with a jacket. …Read more…