What Went Wrong During Your Presentation or Media Interview?

Sometimes you are so focused on preparing for your next presentation or media interview that you overlook Bad Good Better Best Meterthat evaluating your last performance is just as important. What went right – or wrong?

Prepare for Your Post-Mortem

You feel you’ve done everything you could to prepare for your presentation or interview:

  • Key messages nailed down. Check.
  • Practiced and perfected your delivery. Check. …Read more…

Is It Ever OK to Respond “No Comment” to a Reporter?

Yes, but not in those exact words.

No comment

To comment or not to comment?

The conventional wisdom for media interviews is that you never say “no comment” when a reporter asks you a question you can’t or don’t want to answer.

You Must Answer the Question

Of course, you can’t give the reporter confidential company information, or comment during the quite period preceding an IPO. But you cannot ignore the question. You don’t want to use the words “no comment,” which is like waving a red flag. But many interview subjects think they can simply stonewall the reporter and bridge back to their key messages.

That is a big mistake. The reporter will think …Read more…

Does Your High School Yearbook Photo Hold a Clue to Who You Are Now?

As the last New York Mayoral race was heating up, candidates had to undergo scrutiny, not only for their points of view about public policy but also for their personal images.

The Daily News chose a novel way to spotlight the candidates in a story that included photos of them in their high school yearbooks.

NYDailyNews …Read more…

Using Jargon and Acronyms Can Leave Your Audience in the Dark

Mumbo jumbo concept.Every industry has its own jargon and acronyms. Jargon is a form of slang, or shorthand, that conveys a specific meaning to the insiders who use it.

Jargon common to all industries such as “think outside the box” or a “win-win situation” are well known, although they don’t show much originality when used by someone making a presentation.

But if a speaker used “kill chain” in his talk would you know that it’s a military term describing the process of identifying and destroying a target? The speaker might be discussing how to overcome the competition and kill chain certainly has a nice ring to it, even if his audience doesn’t know what it means.

The use of jargon …Read more…