Why It’s Important to Have “Horse Sense” When You’re Presenting

An interview with David Sonatore, LMSW, career/life coach and psychotherapist, who conducts workshops with people and horses to inspire personal and professional growth.

You use horses as a metaphor in working with individuals and companies. How did you come up with this idea?

Inspiring "Horse Sense"

Inspiring “Horse Sense”

The idea actually found me. For over a dozen years as a commercial film and video editor, I had a unique vantage point to observe corporate executives working together toward a common goal – creating a great video. During post-production, stress levels intensified and scapegoating proliferated. These conditions would often reveal dysfunctional teams.

Through personal experience, I saw that …Read more…

“Thank you, Mr. President” — Lessons Learned from Helen Thomas

WH2When Helen Thomas, the legendary White House correspondent, died last week she left us with her legacy of “firsts.”

She was the first woman reporter in the White House press corps, first woman president of the White House Correspondents’ Association, and the first woman elected to the Gridiron Club, a select group of Washington’s most distinguished journalists.

How Did She Do It?

How did she break down the barriers and get into those elite “clubs?” What can we learn from her? …Read more…

Visuals in a Presentation Should Entertain as Well as Inform

An interview with Judith Bookbinder, Vice President, Creative Communications, Hearst Magazines

A good presentation needs to be staged. Your audience needs to be comfortable with where they are. A good presenter sets up a premise, then discusses it and wraps it up. If you don’t, then the audience feels like they’re on a journey but they don’t know where they’re going.

I have certain rules I always follow. Less is better. Never have more than three bullet points with no more than five words for each point (unless it’s someone’s title). Any more than that, you’ll find people are reading while you’re presenting. You’re making them not pay attention to you. A compelling presentation includes a mixture of visuals and bullet points. …Read more…

Can Body Language Decide the Winner of A Presidential Debate?

When President Barack Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney square off in their second debate will body language make the difference?

By most accounts, Gov. Romney won the first round by delivering his key messages forcefully, smiling appropriately, looking directly at the President and using body language to signal that he felt totally in command. He was praised for giving a masterful presentation.

President Obama, on the other hand, was criticized for his lackluster performance. Even he acknowledged, euphemistically, that he had been “too polite.” He looked down at the podium, …Read more…