Does Style Trump Substance in a Presentation or Media Interview?

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Style vs. Substance

Style or substance? Is it your style that will make you a memorable speaker? Or is substance more important in a presentation or media interview?

There isn’t universal agreement, although both are essential qualities for leaders to express their authority and command of their topic.

Make it Look and Taste Good

A speech is like eating a meal in a 5-star restaurant. The food must be …Read more…

Should You Use Profanity in Your Presentations and Media Interviews?

OFFENSIVE LANGUAGEIn addressing financial analysts, Jamie Dimon, the CEO of JPMorgan Chase, made headlines when he uttered a profanity in describing the firm’s legal issues.

He used a fairly mild swear word when he said the company needs to be “…careful to “stop stepping in dog****, which we do now and then.” …Read more…

If You Sound Whiny, Nasal, or Abrasive Consider Getting Voice Training

An interview with Marjorie Feinstein-Whittaker, owner and principal consultant at The Whittaker Group

What kind of vocal issues do corporate executives have when they retain you for coaching?

A little girl voice

A little girl voice

After ruling out any voice conditions that require medical assessment and/or intervention, many corporate executives seek voice and communication training for subjective, personal reasons. Speakers may complain that their voice doesn’t convey the emotions behind their words, they talk too fast, or they just don’t like the sound of their voice.

Often managers express concerns about sounding boring or monotone. People have conveyed to me that they consider their voices to be whiny, nasal, abrasive, immature, or too loud. Others …Read more…

Presentations and Media Interviews are Easy – When You Know How

If you have not have visited the Newman Group’s website lately, then you’ve missed new videos in which Joyce Newman describes what we do and our approach to our specialties: presentation and media training.

We are pleased by the positive feedback to this blog, which we began last fall. Our readers tell us they particularly enjoyed our series on presentation training and our series on crisis communications training.

If you missed these posts, or want a refresher on the techniques of giving a presentation and managing the media during a crisis, the titles and links to the posts are below.

Presentation Training


In these three posts, we discuss preparing for a presentation, giving a presentation, and following up after the presentation:
The Presentation Begins When You Book the Date
The Presentation is Not About You
A Presentation Doesn’t End After the Applause

Media Training for Crisis Communications


These posts describe how to manage an Instant Crisis, an Act of God, and a Brewing Crisis:
Effective Crisis Management Means Sweating the Small Stuff
Crisis Communications When an Act of God Strikes
How a Manicurist Nicked a Finger and Started a Crisis

Blogs That Entertained and Informed

We had some fun with these posts while providing tips on etiquette, what to do when you flub a presentation, where to sit in a meeting, and why your personal image is so important:
Are You Using the Wrong Fork? A Business Primer on Table Manners and Etiquette
Don’t Faint When you Flub a Presentation – Laugh at Yourself
How to Stand Out by Where You Sit Down
Are you Sabotaging Your Presentations With an Out-of-Date Image?

We welcome your comments and also suggestions for topics that you would like us to write about in 2012. See you then.