Should You Use Profanity in Your Presentations and Media Interviews?

OFFENSIVE LANGUAGEIn addressing financial analysts, Jamie Dimon, the CEO of JPMorgan Chase, made headlines when he uttered a profanity in describing the firm’s legal issues a few years ago.

He used a fairly mild swear word when he said the company needs to be “…careful to “stop stepping in dog****, which we do now and then.” …Read more…

Think Before You Speak Because You Can’t Hit Rewind (Mr. Trump)

Think Before you Speak words on Road Sign and Stop SignDo you have a loose tongue? Do you open your mouth and start making indiscreet and potentially embarrassing remarks that will come back to haunt you? You can avoid what’s also called “diarrhea of the mouth” by thinking before you speak.

Were They Ever Sorry

Donald Trump has yet to learn to think before he speaks but two public figures learned this the hard way in the recent past. Emil Michael, former senior vice president for business at Uber, the ride-hailing company, said Uber was considering spying on journalists it considers unfriendly to the company. …Read more…

How to Recover When a Spokesperson Tarnishes Your Brand

Did you catch the video of the Chevrolet zone manager’s presentation of the MVP award to San Francisco Giants’ pitcher Madison Bumgarner after his spectacular win in the 2014 World Series final?

Rikk Wilde, the designated spokesperson, became the butt of a lot of criticism and Chevy’s brand was tarnished – for about 24 hours. Then the Chevrolet PR and ad people decided to make lemonade out of a lemon and jumped all over the giant blooper in advertising and social media.

Here’s the presentation that had everyone talking and what Chevy did about it.

  …Read more…

In a Crisis, Emotions Are as Important as the Words

Survival concept, business man with gas mask isolated on whiteWhen a crisis hits, people don’t actually hear the words of reassurance. They listen with their emotions. Health officials repeatedly explained to the public that you can only become infected with the Ebola virus through direct contact with bodily fluids.

But polls reveal that a majority of Americans fear they can catch the virus through incidental contact and have little confidence in their government’s ability to manage the crisis. …Read more…