Why Memorizing is a Dirty Word

Unless you’re a professional actor who is paid to learn his lines, Identitydon’t try to memorize your presentations — virtual or in-person. Why put more pressure on yourself when you’re already anxious in front of an audience?

Memorizing is a no-win strategy. Instead of engaging with the audience when it’s time to speak, you’re inside your own head trying to remember your lines. It will be panic time if you forget your opener and scramble to fill the void.

Your audience will sense your discomfort and they will become uncomfortable, too. You certainly won’t gain the audience’s confidence if you’re struggling for something to say while fidgeting and …Read more…

Did I Waste My Time Attending That “Mandatory” Staff Meeting?

“Another hour of my time wasted,” you think, as you’re leaving yet another meeting that went nowhere.stop wasting time” That’s very often what staff members think when their leader doesn’t take charge of a meeting (virtual or face-to-face) that he scheduled.

If you are that leader, you need to set the agenda and give clear instructions before the meeting – what people should do to prepare and what outcomes are expected. Participants will end up frustrated when they don’t know what the next steps are. …Read more…

In a Crisis, Emotions Are as Important as the Words

Survival gearWhen a crisis hits, individuals don’t really hear the words of reassurance. They tune in with their feelings. Health authorities repeatedly explained to the public that you can only get contaminated with the Ebola virus through direct contact with bodily fluids.

But surveys uncovered that a greater part of Americans feared they can get the infection through incidental contact and have little trust in their government’s capacity to deal with the crisis. …Read more…

You Can’t Rush the Chicken and Undercook the Training

chicken with cutlery and chef's hat“Ripeness is all”…William Shakespeare

It happens often. The phone rings, and on the other end is a panicked voice asking for an appointment for speaker training right away. “When are you speaking?” we ask. “Next May,” he replies (over six months from now).

Don’t Rush the Chicken

Training is like cooking a chicken – take it out too soon and it’s raw and not ready to eat. You can’t rush the chicken, just like you can’t rush the training. The process works smoothly when …Read more…