A Presentation Doesn’t End After the Applause

Congratulations! You’ve just delivered a well-received presentation.

As we advised in our first two posts on preparing for the presentation and giving a presentation, you still have work to do.

Critique Your Speech

After the speech, if you’ve been audio or video taped, make time to listen or watch yourself in action. You’ll likely never improve without …Read more…

Presentations and Media Interviews are Easy – When You Know How

If you have not have visited the Newman Group’s website lately, then you’ve missed the videos that describe what we do and our approach to our specialties: presentation and media training. Plus, we are getting ready to announce virtual training sessions in the post-Covid-19 age and you are among the very first to know about it.

We are pleased by the positive feedback to this blog. Our readers tell us they particularly enjoyed our series on presentation training and our series on crisis communications training.

If you missed these posts, or want a refresher on the techniques of giving a presentation and managing the media during a crisis, the titles and links to the posts are below.

Presentation Training

In these three posts, we discuss preparing for a presentation, giving a presentation, and following up after the presentation:
The Presentation Begins When You Book the Date
The Presentation is Not About You
A Presentation Doesn’t End After the Applause

Media Training for Crisis Communications

These posts describe how to manage an Instant Crisis, an Act of God, and a Brewing Crisis:
Effective Crisis Management Means Sweating the Small Stuff
Crisis Communications When an Act of God Strikes
How a Manicurist Nicked a Finger and Started a Crisis

Blogs That Entertained and Informed

We had some fun with these posts while providing tips on etiquette, what to do when you flub a presentation, where to sit in a meeting, and why your personal image is so important:
Are You Using the Wrong Fork? A Business Primer on Table Manners and Etiquette
Don’t Faint When you Flub a Presentation – Laugh at Yourself
How to Stand Out by Where You Sit Down
Are you Sabotaging Your Presentations With an Out-of-Date Image?

We welcome your comments and also suggestions for topics that you would like us to write about in the future.

Why It’s Important to Have “Horse Sense” When You’re Presenting

An interview with David Sonatore, LMSW, career/life coach and psychotherapist, who conducts workshops with people and horses to inspire personal and professional growth.

You use horses as a metaphor in working with individuals and companies. How did you come up with this idea?

Inspiring "Horse Sense"

Inspiring “Horse Sense”

The idea actually found me. For over a dozen years as a commercial film and video editor, I had a unique vantage point to observe corporate executives working together toward a common goal – creating a great video. During post-production, stress levels intensified and scapegoating proliferated. These conditions would often reveal dysfunctional teams.

Through personal experience, I saw that …Read more…

Will Your “Tells” Derail Your Presentation or Media Interview?

Even after just about 60 years, political pundits still talk about the “tells” that derailed Richard Nixon’s bid for the Presidency in 1960.

“Tells” are subtle changes in a person’s behavior or demeanor that are dead giveaways that the person is nervous and uncomfortable during a presentation or media interview. If you’ve ever watched The World Series of Poker on TV, then you know about the “tells” that expose the strength or weakness of a player’s hand.

See if you can spot the “tells” in just the first two minutes of this first ever televised Presidential debate, between Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy.

…Read more…