Will Your “Tells” Derail Your Presentation or Media Interview?

Even after almost 60 years, political pundits still talk about the “tells” that derailed Richard Nixon’s bid for the Presidency in 1960.

“Tells” are subtle changes in a person’s behavior or demeanor that are dead giveaways that the person is nervous and uncomfortable during a presentation or media interview. If you’ve ever watched The World Series of Poker on TV, then you know about the “tells” that expose the strength or weakness of a player’s hand.

See if you can spot the “tells” in just the first two minutes of this first ever televised Presidential debate, between Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy.

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Getting Fit for a Presentation Mentally, Physically and Emotionally

Presentation FitnessBeing prepared to speak is about more than simply the words you’re going to say. You need to be mentally, physically and emotionally fit to make a positive first impression. There aren’t any do-overs in a presentation.

Develop Mental Toughness

It’s important to take care of yourself at every level. Being fit includes building mental toughness. You’ll be more alert by getting enough sleep the night before your presentation. Mental fitness also means being totally conversant about your topic and up to date on new developments in your industry. …Read more…

Tips to Remember That Name When You’re Drawing a Blank

Have you ever been at an event and started to introduce your boss to a Very Important Person and then, out of the blue, you couldn’t remember the VIP’s name? You’re a rare and lucky person if that hasn’t happened to you.

What do you do? How do you recover and save face?

It’s Not the End of the World

During this time of year you will no doubt be making the rounds of parties. Parties mean lots of reconnections and introductions to cope with.

You won’t lose a potential account if you forget a prospect’s name when you bump into him at the bar. It’s how you present yourself and handle the situation. …Read more…

How to Give Feedback Without Reducing Someone to Tears

Employees, performers, investors and inventors always say they want feedback on how they did. But do they really want to hear the bad along with the good?

Most people are hoping for positive feedback. But most of us also learn from our mistakes and benefit from constructive criticism. There is a right way and a wrong way, though, to give feedback after a presentation or media interview, without reducing someone to tears.

Accentuate the Positive

When critiquing a presentation with someone, …Read more…