Do Integrity and Trust Still Count for Anything?

Not to be cynical, but the recent past hasn’t been so encouraging if you still believe that trust and integrity count in this world.

Not so long ago, CNN released the contents of the late Lybian Ambassador Christopher Stevens’ personal journal, after reportedly assuring his family that it wouldn’t. Commenting on the CNN brouhaha, a spokesperson for Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was quoted as telling a reporter to f–k off.

Do Integrity and Trust Count?

The photo of a topless Duchess of Cambridge sun bathing on a private vacation was another media shocker. After the photo appeared in a French magazine, other media took the attitude “they printed it so why can’t we?” So the image is going viral in other countries (but not the U.K.) and so far as we know not the U.S. …Read more…

Is That You in the YouTube Video — Drunk at the Holiday Party?!

Jingle Jingle

Oh, no. Your worst fears have come true. You had too much to drink at your company’s holiday party and you ended up on the floor. A “friend” captured the embarrassing incident on his smart phone and thought it would be funny to post it to YouTube and tweet the link to his Twitter followers.

Now the video is getting hundreds of views. Your boss and clients are furious to see you smashed and making nasty comments about them. You’ve damaged your reputation and personal brand.

That image of you on the floor will live on in perpetuity. Very likely there is someone …Read more…

Fake it Till You Become it — the “Power Person” in the Room

The popular concept “fake it till you make it” dates to Aristotle who famously proclaimed that acting virtuous will make you virtuous.

But Harvard social psychologist Amy Cuddy has a new take on this old expression: “Fake it Till You Become it.”

Power Poses

In her TED presentation, “How Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are,” Cuddy gives examples from her research that faking it actually works. As she says, “…when you pretend to be powerful, you are also more likely to feel powerful.” …Read more…

Choose the Proper Elements of Style for Your Presentations

The first presentation by me I’ll always remember. You would never use the passive tense to say, “I’ll always remember my first presentation.” Would you?

Yet speakers too often use passive tenses in their presentationsUse proper grammar in your presentations As Strunk and White state in their classic The Elements of Style: “Avoid tame, colorless, hesitating, noncommittal language.”

This gem of a book has guided writers for more than 50 years. In 2011, Time Magazine listed it among The Best 100 Non-Fiction Books ever written. We urge everyone who values simple writing to read it. …Read more…