#MeToo #TimesUp #5050by2020 #WhatsUpNext #WomensHistoryMonth

Will Women’s History Month (March) 2018 once again be detached from the present? Or, will it recognize that we live in a country that feels deeply divided – by geography, race, class, religion, media, political worldview – and help solidify a Fourth Wave of Feminism?

The intention of the #MeToo hashtag was to empower women through empathy, especially young, vulnerable women, according to creator Tarana Burke. After millions of people shared their own #MeToo stories, #TimesUp shifted and expanded the purpose from being a movement exposing the prevalence of sexual violence against individuals to one with broader implications and potential political impact.

Is This the Fourth Wave Feminism?

“Download This Chapter” from Women of Wisdom — PDF

Feminism is the one-word simplification of the two words “Women’s Movement.” The First Wave of feminism largely dealt with the station of White women involved in suffrage and political equality in the 19th century and early 20th century.

Second Wave feminism began in the 1960s with protests against the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City and continued into the ‘90s focusing on guaranteeing social equality regardless of sex.

“Particular Passions: Talks with Women Who Shaped Our Times: Women of Wisdom” by Lynn Gilbert and Gaylen Moore, is an absorbing collection of portraits  and edited transcripts of 42 iconic women from the Second Wave including Billie Jean King, who is particularly close to our hearts.

As portrayed in the 2017 film, “The Battle of the Sexes”, Billie Jean was a driving force behind the Virginia Slims tennis series because she wanted to end inequality of pay between male and women on the courts.

Virgina Slims Media Training

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We had the privilege of working next to Billie Jean King in media training the Original 9 players and the many that followed into what evolved into the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA). As the number of players grew in the Slims series, she frequently joined our training sessions to emphasize that a player’s role was as important in developing the women’s sport off the court as on.

At the time of her match with Bobby Riggs Billie Jean said, “To beat a fifty-nine-year-old guy was no thrill. The thrill was exposing a lot of new people to tennis. The most important thing was that women liked themselves better that day.”

“I walked into the offices of the Philadelphia Bulletin a few weeks later and all the secretaries stood up and clapped. They just went berserk. The editor said, ‘You have no idea what you did. The day after you played Bobby Riggs, all of these women asked for a raise,’” Billie Jean recalled in Particular Passions.

Women of Wisdom

Photographer/Author Lynn Gilbert says “when I photographed the women for the book, including Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem and Barbara Walters, it was the height of the Second Women’s movement. Billie Jean King, was one of the most outspoken supporters of gender equality. She not only brought about change on the tennis court, but in all sports. These changes filtered into in the workplace, not just in America, but around the world.”

“We are at a moment in time, where the ground work for Women’s Rights is coming to fruition. Women want equality to men written into the constitution. Who knew that it doesn’t exist under the law? I had no idea and neither did my friends,” she added.

Lynn Gilbert’s portraits of Billie Jean and Barbara Walters are part of the permanent collection of Washington’s National Portrait Gallery. Other portraits in her book include Julia Child, Betty Friedan, Ruth Bader Ginsburg,  Louise Nevelson, and Gloria Steinem. These are being featured on 21 New York City bus kiosks during Women’s History Month.

Historians say the Third Wave of feminism began in the early 1990s was a response to the perceived failures of the Second Wave and its emphasis on the experiences of upper middle-class white women. Will Women’s History Month 2018 blend the past with #MeToo, #TimesUp, and #5050by2020 to serve as a catalyst for the Fourth Wave as #WhatsUpNext?

Happy Thanksgiving To You and Your Loved Ones

In celebrating Thanksgiving, we’d like to pay special tribute to Joyce Newman, founder of The Newman Group, who influenced the professional and personal lives of thousands of people, and Maya Angelou, the author and poet whose magical words and expressions Fotolia_24795853_XS-300x3001always got to the heart of the human experience.

Joyce passed away in January 2017 after valiantly battling a very aggressive and treatment-resistant form of Multiple Myeloma for just over two years. She wanted nothing more than to continue living and loving life and to continue her work.

Maya passed away in 2014 but her sentiments, like Joyce’s, will continue to inspire generations to come. A favorite of Joyce’s that is often used in presentations is:
I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.

It’s so easy to toss off a stinging criticism or to ignore a job well done. We know it’s thoughtless but we make the excuse that we didn’t mean it or didn’t have time to extend a compliment.

Maya reminds us that our actions have lasting consequences. So let’s get into the holiday spirit with other inspirational quotes from this iconic woman: …Read more…

Mentoring Creates a Lasting and Treasured Personal Bond

Mentor SignboardPossibly you’ve never had a formal mentor, but like many of us, you’ve been mentored and have mentored others.

It just wasn’t called mentoring because you didn’t put a name tag on helping another person become better at her job and more skilled at building professional relationships.

Why Be a Mentor?

Mentoring means different things to different people. Very large organizations have mentoring programs …Read more…

Giving Praise to Inspire Your Staff to Greatness

“There are two things people want more than sex and money… recognition and praise” — Mary Kay AshThumbs Up and  a Well Done! on a blackboard 

Mary Kay Ash established the global Mary Kay® direct-sales cosmetic business in 1963 with $5,000 and the help of her 20-year-old son. Today it is a $2 billion company.

Mary Kay built the foundation of her business on the Golden Rule. She advocated, …Read more…