Don’t Eat the Microphone When Delivering a Presentation

Business conferenceYou slaved over preparing your talk, practiced hard, and no one in the audience heard you.

Sometimes it’s the simple things that will trip you up when you’re delivering a speech or presentation, like not using a microphone. And it is pretty easy to create the same problem in a virtual presentation where you are the actor, director and producer.

Pre-pandemic, a board member of Lincoln Center was moderating a panel in a very noisy venue and he began by stating, “I can speak loudly so I won’t use the microphone.” A chorus of “No’s” greeted his remark! He was lucky because his audience saved him the embarrassment of not being heard. …Read more…

Can You Take Self-Deprecation Too Far When You’re Presenting?

Clever vs Stupid Word Scale

Self Deprecation

A lot of speakers start their presentations or speeches with a self-deprecating remark to get the audience on their side. It’s not uncommon that a powerful leader with established credentials wants to put the audience at ease so he uses self-deprecation to help the audience feel more comfortable. Sometimes he’ll start with a funny story about himself.

On the Other Hand . . .

Too many speakers, however, really feel insecure and believe they are inadequate. They need to get in the first lick – to communicate their own failings before someone else can launch an attack. …Read more…

Projecting Your Personal Brand in a Media Interview or Presentation

Personal BrandingHave you ever asked yourself: what is it about me that would make an audience want to attend my presentation or motivate a reporter to seek me out for an interview?

We all like to think that we’re experts in our subject areas. But no doubt a web search would uncover many other highly qualified people in your field. Conference organizers and reporters are searching the web for experts who can …Read more…

Was the Podium at Your Presentation Too Tall or Were You Too Short?

Anyone who saw the 2007 video of Queen Elizabeth being greeted by President George H. Bush will never forget that when the Queen stepped to the lectern to speak all you could see was her royal hat.

No one remembers what she said, but they remember her bobbing bonnet. It was a huge embarrassment for the president’s staff. They forgot to place a step-up box at the podium after the tall president spoke so the Queen’s face would be visible when it was her turn to speak.

The following day she addressed Congress and got a big laugh and a standing ovation with her opening line, “I do hope you can see me today.” …Read more…