What To Do When the Reporter Doesn’t Quote Your Client: Duck.

If you’re in the PR business long enough, it’s bound to happen. Writer, journalist - Giornalista, scrittoreYou open The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal and your stomach flip-flops. The reporter didn’t quote your client, or CEO, in his story. How do you explain this to your client?

Take a Deep Breath

First, take a deep breath and calm yourself. It only seems like the end of the world. Should you call the reporter? It depends. This isn’t weaseling out of the answer. It’s a judgment call.

Then, ask yourself why you think the reporter didn’t quote your client. Was your client on point with his key messages? Did he give the reporter the information he needed?

If you’ve answered in the affirmative, consider contacting the reporter. If you know the reporter …Read more…

Is It Ever OK to Respond “No Comment” to a Reporter?

Yes, but not in those exact words.

No comment

To comment or not to comment?

The conventional wisdom for media interviews is that you never say “no comment” when a reporter asks you a question you can’t or don’t want to answer.

You Must Answer the Question

Of course, you can’t give the reporter confidential company information, or comment during the quite period preceding an IPO. But you cannot ignore the question. You don’t want to use the words “no comment,” which is like waving a red flag. But many interview subjects think they can simply stonewall the reporter and bridge back to their key messages.

That is a big mistake. The reporter will think …Read more…