Did You Forget to Answer My Email or Were You Just Being Rude?

Netiquette word cloud with abstract backgroundWe’re all swamped with emails, but do you routinely ignore your business correspondence? Am I not important enough for you to respond in a timely manner, or do you just treat everyone rudely?

What’s Timely?

If you’re in the client service business, then it’s advisable to establish the ground rules for emails. Discuss an acceptable time frame with your client. A fairly common guideline is to answer by end of day. But suppose you’re working on a crisis. …Read more…

Should You Use Profanity in Your Presentations and Media Interviews?

Offensive LanguageIn addressing financial analysts, Jamie Dimon, the CEO of JPMorgan Chase, made headlines when he uttered a profanity in describing the firm’s legal issues a few years ago.

He used a fairly mild swear word when he said the company needs to be “…careful to “stop stepping in dog****, which we do now and then.” …Read more…

Don’t Bother With Apologies If You’re Always Late or Longwinded

Some people are always late. Business woman showing the time on her wrist watch.They usually offer an excuse like “I missed the train” or “I was stuck on a phone call with a friend.” But after a while these excuses grow old. They could have made more time to get to the station or called the friend back later.

Observe the Guidelines

It’s not only being late for meetings, but includes speakers ignoring time guidelines. We were reminded of this when former Yankees manager Joe Torres was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. …Read more…

Don’t Eat the Microphone When Delivering a Presentation

Business conferenceYou slaved over preparing your talk, practiced hard, and no one in the audience heard you.

Sometimes it’s the simple things that will trip you up when you’re delivering a speech or presentation, like not using a microphone. And it is pretty easy to create the same problem in a virtual presentation where you are the actor, director and producer.

Pre-pandemic, a board member of Lincoln Center was moderating a panel in a very noisy venue and he began by stating, “I can speak loudly so I won’t use the microphone.” A chorus of “No’s” greeted his remark! He was lucky because his audience saved him the embarrassment of not being heard. …Read more…